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Media Release: AUT research reveals how sports clubs manage integrity issues

Media Release: AUT research reveals how sports clubs manage integrity issues

A national survey of sports clubs has produced valuable insights into how threats to integrity are perceived and dealt with in New Zealand’s sporting communities.

With funding from the Sport and Recreation Integrity Transition Programme (ITP) – the organisation tasked with establishing the forthcoming Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission – the 2023 National Sport Club Survey (NSCS) included questions about integrity for the first time.

The NSCS generates an annual snapshot of the management, operation, and governance of New Zealand’s sport clubs.

It is run through a partnership between AUT’s Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand (SPRINZ) and the New Zealand Amateur Sport Association (NZASA).

In 2023, 800 clubs (out of 7,500) responded to the NSCS across 80 sports and all 16 regions of New Zealand.

Chairs, presidents, secretaries, and other leaders completed the survey on behalf of their clubs.

In 2023, the ITP commissioned a series of NSCS questions to explore club committees’ perceptions of threats to integrity in community sport and gain an understanding of the level of preparedness to manage integrity issues and complaints at club level.

The survey generated responses from over 800 clubs nation-wide.

“AUT’s work has provided hugely valuable insights into how integrity issues are viewed by our sporting clubs and their communities,” ITP Director Rebecca Rolls said.

“These insights have helped shape our thinking as we continue the work of establishing the new Commission, which will be operational from July 1 this year.”

“Obviously we wouldn’t have this information without hundreds of club officials having taken the time to complete the survey – so a massive thanks to them for making that effort. It’s very much appreciated.”

Key findings from the survey include:

  • Over half (56 per cent) of clubs surveyed felt their committee was well prepared to deal with integrity issues.
  • However over 80 per cent of clubs report that they either never or rarely discuss identified integrity issues at committee level. This suggests an over-confidence among clubs about their capabilities when it comes to integrity issues and an overreliance on ‘open door’ approaches to the self-reporting of integrity concerns.
  • 22 per cent of clubs have used information from or support from their national body (NSO) to help address an integrity issue.
  • 34 per cent of clubs are aware of the Sport and Recreation Complaints and Mediation Service – a function that will transfer to the new Commission.

As part of the NSCS Project Team, AUT researchers have welcomed the opportunity to work with the ITP to better understand sport integrity at club committee/board level.

“We, and the NZASA, are very aware of the demands on community sport clubs, including their mainly volunteer committees. We expected the survey would reveal gaps in club approaches to sport integrity, but also some great ideas to help community sport fill those sport integrity gaps” says the NSCS’s sport integrity project lead, Dr Tracy Molloy.

Some of the reported current club sport integrity initiatives include:

  • Positions – including athlete representatives, peer supporters, welfare officers, coach integrity officers and child protection officers.
  • Practices – including anonymous reporting mechanisms (online or suggestion boxes), regular integrity messaging (committee/team meetings, newsletters, posters, flyers) and regular/intentional check-ins with coaches/participants (to promote visibility and approachability).
  • Training – however, with a narrow focus on child safeguarding as opposed to broader integrity education (an area for future development).

One club surveyed “all members on an anonymous basis on all matters related to the club culture with particular emphasis on ‘being heard’, transparency, discrimination, and social responsibility …”.

Another club “has introduced aspects of tikanga… We are working on good communication, living/modelling our recently articulated values.”

AUT SPRINZ sport integrity researcher, Dr Molloy, is “encouraged that these initiatives provide great lessons to share as well as a platform on which to develop a more positive culture-building (in addition to the punishment) approach to the sport integrity environment”.

The NSCS report ‘Integrity in Community Sport’ concludes with future considerations for community sport clubs and the new Integrity Sport & Recreation Commission. Click this link to read the report.

About the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission

  • An independent Crown entity, the Commission was established by the Integrity Sport and Recreation Act and will be operational by July 1, 2024.
  • Its purpose is to enhance integrity within sport and physical recreation, which will help increase the safety and well-being of participants and preserve the fairness of competition.
  • The goal is to improve trust and confidence in sport and recreation at all levels – and create safer and fairer experiences for all.
  • The Commission will also be responsible for the anti-doping functions performed by Drug Free Sport NZ.
  • It will set minimum standards of behaviour and processes for organisations and individuals (through an Integrity Code), and will provide education, training and guidance for sector organisations.
  • It will operate a complaints and resolution service, and take a lead role in improving our response to competition manipulation.

Find out more at: http://integritytransition.org.nz/

ENDS

For more information and to arrange media interviews contact:

Annie Hogan
Communications Manager
Mobile +64 21 725 259
Email [email protected]


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Media Release: High-performance athlete group to assist with developing Code of Integrity for Sport and Recreation

Media Release: High-performance athlete group to assist with developing Code of Integrity for Sport and Recreation

A 12-strong group of current and former high-performance athletes with a diverse range of skills and experiences has been assembled to assist with the drafting of a Code of Integrity for sport and recreation.

The high-powered group consists of athletes from cycling, rowing, triathlon, weightlifting, shooting, sailing, gymnastics, and boxing.

It has been convened by the Integrity Transition Programme, which is undertaking the work to establish the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission.

The Commission is a new independent Crown entity tasked with protecting and promoting the safety and well-being of participants and the fairness of competition in New Zealand’s sport and recreation sector.

It is due to be operational by July 2024.

“It’s fantastic to see such an amazing group of athletes put their hands up to help with this important mahi,” Integrity Transition Programme director Rebecca Rolls said.

“The Code is intended to be the cornerstone of New Zealand’s sport and recreation integrity system. It will exist for the benefit of everyone involved in sport and recreation, so it’s vital it is shaped by people from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences.”

A recent public survey seeking input into the Code attracted over 2,000 responses. The next step is to take the broad themes highlighted in the survey and examine them in more detail with a range of focus and reference groups – one of which consists of high-performance athletes.

“While the Code is for everyone, high-performance athletes have unique perspectives and insights, so we are very keen to hear their views,” Rolls said.

The group of current or recently retired athletes was selected following a call for expressions of interest to the high-performance athlete community. It will be chaired by former Olympic cyclist Rushlee Buchanan.

A four-time national road race champion, Buchanan competed at the 2020 Olympics in the Maddison and Team Pursuit – an event in which she claimed three world championship bronze medals.

Currently a sports convener at St Peter’s School in Cambridge, Buchanan previously chaired Cycling NZ’s Athlete Voice Committee, and obtained a Masters of Sport Management from Massey University, based on an in-depth review of Cycling NZ’s BMX programme.

“I’m excited to listen to everyone else’s stories and perspectives and work together on something really awesome for the wider community,” Buchanan said of her appointment.

It was particularly important the group’s focus extended beyond athletes who had reached the pinnacle of their sport, Buchanan said.

“Only a small percentage of New Zealanders are involved in high-performance sport, so it is going to be important for us to not get too caught up on the values of high-performance sport.

“Where it really matters is that level below. That is where we lose so many people because they don’t feel heard or valued or seen.”

Including the perspectives of athletes in their late teens and early 20s would be crucial for the Code’s relevance, Buchanan said.

“That’s such a critical voice. They are literally our next generation, so we need to take notice of what their values and beliefs are. That changes as each generation comes through and if we are not listening and paying attention then we are not going to provide them with the right opportunities and sport will decline.

“You can kind of see that happening in some spaces already.”

The Athlete Reference Group includes triathletes Andrea Hansen and Ryan Sissons, rowers Ella Greenslade, James Scott and Toby Cunliffe-Steel, weightlifters Cameron McTaggart and Tracey Lambrechs, shooter Natalie Brunzel, sailor Sara Winther, gymnast Olivia Jöbsis and boxer Troy Garton.

 

The Integrity Transition Programme Athlete Reference Group 

  • Rushlee Buchanan (Chair) – Cycling
  • Andrea Hansen – Triathlon
  • Cameron McTaggart – Weightlifting
  • Ella Greenslade – Rowing
  • James Scott – Rowing
  • Natalie Brunzel – Shooting (Para athlete)
  • Olivia Jöbsis – Gymnastics
  • Ryan Sissons – Triathlon
  • Sara Winther – Sailing
  • Toby Cunliffe-Steel – Rowing
  • Tracey Lambrechs – Weightlifting
  • Troy Garton – Boxing

 

ENDS 
For more information contact: Steve Deane 021 975 150 or email
enquiries@localhost 


Crowd enjoying some sport from the stadium

Media Release: Adine Wilson appointed to Integrity in Sport and Recreation Establishment Board

Media Release: Adine Wilson appointed to Integrity in Sport and Recreation Establishment Board

Former Silver Ferns captain and sports lawyer Adine Wilson has been appointed to the four-member Establishment Board that is overseeing the creation of the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission – a new Independent Crown Entity responsible for protecting and promoting the safety and well-being of participants and the fairness of competition in New Zealand’s sport and recreation sector.

As captain of the Silver Ferns, Wilson led New Zealand to the gold medal at the 2006 Commonwealth Games. The out-going chair of the New Zealand Netball Players’ Association, Wilson currently works as a lawyer with Meredith Connell in its sports law department.

“Sport has been a huge, incredibly positive part of my life,” Wilson said.  

“Joining the Integrity in Sport and Recreation Establishment Board is a great chance to play a part in helping to ensure all New Zealanders have the best possible experiences when they participate in sport and recreation. It’s a massive part of who we are as Kiwis.”

As a mother of two sporty teenage boys, Wilson says she is particularly focused on wellbeing and safety at all levels of participation.

“I was lucky enough to experience playing sport in that elite space and now, through the kids, I’m getting to experience what it is like coming through school sports and at that real grass roots level.

“I’m a big believer that you just want everybody to be able to play sport, to have access to safe spaces where they can have great experiences.”

Wilson joins Don Mackinnon (chair) Tim Castle and Traci Houpapa on the four-member board. She replaces Alexis Pritchard, the former international boxer who stood down from the Establishment Board to take up a position as Athlete Engagement Lead for the New Zealand Olympic Committee.

The Integrity Sport and Recreation Act that establishes the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission was enacted on August 23, 2023. 

Due to be operational by July 2024, the Commission will be independent from existing Government entities, including Sport NZ and High Performance Sport NZ.

The Commission will take on parts of the existing sport and recreation integrity landscape, including Drug Free Sport New Zealand and Sport New Zealand’s integrity functions including its complaints and mediation service.

It will also be responsible for a strengthened approach to competition manipulation and corruption.

Establishment Board chair Don Mackinnon welcomed Wilson’s appointment to the Board.

“Adine is an icon of New Zealand sport whose work establishing the NZNPA has helped shaped our nation’s sporting landscape,” Mackinnon said.

“I know she will add tremendous value to the Board as we continue the work to establish the Commission.”

About the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission  

  • The Commission is tasked with protecting and promoting the safety and well-being of participants and the fairness of competition in New Zealand’s sport and recreation sector.  
  • Due to be operational by June 2024, it will be independent from existing Government entities, including Sport NZ and High Performance Sport NZ.  
  • The Commission will take on parts of the existing sport and recreation integrity landscape, including Drug Free Sport New Zealand and Sport New Zealand’s integrity functions, as well as the current complaints and mediation mechanism.  
  • It will be responsible for a strengthened approach to competition manipulation and corruption.  
  • For more information about the Integrity Transition Programme visit: www.integritytransition.org.nz
     

Integrity Transition Programme Establishment Board  

Don Mackinnon (chair)  

Don Mackinnon is one of New Zealand’s leading sports lawyers and directors. He is currently Chair of super rugby club The Blues, is a long serving director of NZ Cricket (and Chair of its High Performance Committee) and is also Chair of the Integrity Vetting Panel of World Athletics based in Monaco.

Don has previously served as a director of Sport NZ, High Performance Sport NZ, was Chair of Netball NZ and chaired the Sport and Recreation Integrity Working Group.

Traci Houpapa  

An award-winning company director and recognised industry leader, Traci Houpapa is a trusted advisor to Māori, Government and industry on strategic and economic development.

Traci holds a number of directorships in the public and private sector, including Chiefs Rugby Club and NZ Trade and Enterprise.

Traci was appointed a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit, for services to business and Māori in the 2012 Queen’s Birthday honours.

Tim Castle  

Tim is in private practice as a barrister and is the current Chair of DFSNZ.He is widely known and respected for his expertise and experience, in the fields of national and international sports law, mediation and governance, and working for and with Iwi/hapū Māori to advance recognition and integration of Māori Treaty rights.Tim provides strategic advice to national and international umbrella sporting bodies, high profile national sporting organisations, athletes and support professionals.Tim also represents, as agent and manager, several elite New Zealand athletes across codes and gender, and is an accredited agent with NZRPA. He has significant experience as a mediator in sport

Adine Wilson  

A former Silver Ferns captain, Wilson led New Zealand to gold medal at 2006 Commonwealth Games.

A commercial lawyer with Meredith Connell in its sports law team, Wilson helped establish the NZ Netball Players Association, serving on its board for 17 years.

She is a trustee of the Tania Dalton Foundation, and also works as a commentator for Sky Sports.

 

ENDS 
For more information contact: Steve Deane 021 975 150 or email
enquiries@localhost 


Crowd enjoying some sport from the stadium

Legislation passed its final reading in Parliament

New standalone integrity entity for sport formally established

Legislation establishing an independent body to strengthen and protect the integrity of the sport and recreation system has passed its final reading in Parliament with almost unanimous support.

The Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission will be an independent Crown Entity when it is becomes operational next year.

Read Ministerial release

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Establishment Board appointed

Establishment Board appointed  

The Minister for Sport and Recreation has appointed an Establishment Board commencing in May 2023, consisting of Don Mackinnon (chair), Tim Castle, Alexis Pritchard and Traci Houpapa. You can read a little about them here: Members – Integrity Transition Programme

The Establishment Board is a Ministerial Advisory Committee set up by the Minister for Sport and Recreation to oversee the establishment of a new independent Crown entity that will protect and promote the safety and well-being of participants and the fairness of competition in sport and physical recreation.

The Establishment Board replaces the Sport and Recreation Integrity Transition Committee which operated from July 2022 to May 2023.


Crowd enjoying some sport from the stadium

Submissions invited on the Integrity Sport and Recreation Bill

Submissions invited on the Integrity Sport and Recreation Bill  

The Social Services and Community Committee is now calling for submissions on the Integrity Sport and Recreation Bill. The closing date for submissions is Wednesday, 03 May 2023.  

Submissions can only be made through this website: Integrity Sport and Recreation Bill – New Zealand Parliament (www.parliament.nz) 

The Integrity Sport and Recreation Bill is required to establish a new independent Crown entity: the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission.  

Key functions of the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission include: 

  • ​providing guidance and education to the sport and recreation sector and engaging with participants on integrity issues 
  • establishing integrity codes, investigating breaches of codes and other threats of integrity 
  • providing policies and procedures for complaints managements and dispute resolution 
  • implementing the Word Anti-Doping Code and creating sports anti-doping rules. 

More information is available on the Parliament website: How to make a submission


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Legislation introduced to establish new integrity entity

Legislation introduced to establish new integrity entity   

The Integrity Sport and Recreation Bill has been introduced and passed its first reading in Parliament on April 4th, 2023. You can read Minister Robertson’s press release and watch his speech from the first reading: New Sport Integrity body a step closer, Minister’s Speech. 

This follows a Cabinet decision in September 2022, to establish a new independent organisation for integrity in sport and active recreation, that will become operational in 2024 . You can read the Cabinet Paper and decisions here: Cabinet Paper – Protecting and Promoting the Integrity of Sport and Active Recreation (sportnz.org.nz). 

The legislation will establish the Integrity Sport and Recreation Commission as an independent Crown entity. It will ensure that integrity matters are dealt with appropriately, quickly and in ways that reflect the needs and diversity of participants.  

We encourage you to provide feedback on the Bill. You can do this by making a submission to the Government’s Social Services and Community Committee. Your submission can be as brief as a single sentence, or as long as you like. We will update this page when submissions are invited, and you can keep an eye on the Select Committee’s progress here: https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/sc/scl/social-services-and-community/

For updates, and further information in relation to the work of the Transition Programme, keep an eye on our News and updates  or contact us at  enquiries@localhost. 


Crowd enjoying some sport from the stadium

New integrity entity confirmed by Cabinet 

New integrity entity confirmed by Cabinet 

In October, Cabinet confirmed its intention to establish a new integrity entity and agreed a working title for the new organisation of ‘Integrity Sport and Recreation NZ’ (ISRNZ).  ISRNZ’s high level purpose has also been confirmed as promoting and protecting the safety of participants in sport and active recreation. ISRNZ will do this by preventing and addressing threats to integrity in sport and active recreation, and promoting participants’ trust and confidence in integrity within the sector. You can read more about the high-level purpose and principles of ISRNZ in the October Cabinet paper, which will soon be available on both the Sport NZ website and the Integrity Transition Programme website.     The Integrity Programme Team is working towards having legislation introduced in 2023 (subject to Government timelines for the introduction of legislation) to establish ISRNZ to then become operational in 2024.  The team is undertaking targeted consultation on the eventual legal name (which may change from ISRNZ as a result) so that it can be confirmed ahead of legislation being introduced.    The Sport NZ Integrity Team will continue to provide support and guidance on integrity related themes – with a range of tools and resources available here – until ISRNZ is established.  You can learn more about the work of the Programme at www.integritytransition.org.nz, or contact the Programme directly at enquiries@localhost.


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An update from the Integrity Transition Programme  

An update from the Integrity Transition Programme  

Following the Minister’s announcement in June about establishing an independent body to strengthen and protect the integrity of the sport and recreation system, an independent Integrity Transition Committee and Transition Programme team were put in place, to progress work on the overall purpose and role of the new body including what functions and powers it needs to best achieve its purpose.  Advice to the Minister has been provided about the make-up of the new entity, and decisions are expected in October. A further priority for the Transition Programme will be targeted engagement with the sector, including participants, Māori and other relevant stakeholders. This will take place over several months from November and will include gathering feedback on the development of a national code of integrity and how that could introduce and set-out integrity standards for the greater protection of participants in active recreation and sport. The new body will likely be established and available from early 2024. Until then the Sport NZ Integrity Team continues to provide support and guidance to the sector on integrity-related themes, with a range of resources and tools available here. For updates, and further information in relation to the work of the Transition Programme, keep an eye on the website: www.integritytransition.org.nz or contact us at enquiries@localhost.